Queens College Civil Rights Archives

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Inscription from Andrew Goodman's parents to James Forman in a specially prepared volume that collects the eulogies delivered at the Society for Ethical Culture in New York City in 1964. Contains eulogies from Algernon D. Black, Martin Popper, Ralph…

James Forman annotation of page 82 of Getting Organized: The Easy Way to Put Your Life in Order under the heading "Setting Up a Paperwork System from Scratch."

Annotation made by James Forman on the first, unnumbered page in How to Get Control of Your Time and Your Life.

The copy includes numerous marked passages of gangland stories about old Chicago, where Forman grew up and went to school. Forman researched organized crime and the Forman Library includes FBI files on civil rights activists and mob bosses.Maclean,…

This photocopied clipping dated June 25, 1965, from the Jackson Daily News in Mississippi, is cited by the FBI to corroborate James Forman's activities as a classified "Rabble Rouser." The FBI followed a policy of collecting published news reports…

Backed by the National Black Economic Development Conference, based in Detroit, Forman issued the Black Manifesto, calling for $500 million from religious groups as payback for slavery. "Racist white America," the Manifesto reads, "has exploited our…

Paperback copy of "an information and instructional kit." In Forman's works and writings, information and education are core princples of radical activism. Though Forman believed in the use of violence when provoked, much of his work as an organizer…

The Occult and the Third Reich by Jean-Michel Angebert. The flyleaf seems to be inscribed by Forman to "Mr. Kissinger," perhaps an intended presentation copy to Nixon's Secretary of State.

Hardcover copy of book. In Forman's works and writings, information and education are core princples of radical activism. Though Forman believed in the use of violence when provoked, much of his work as an organizer for SNCC in the early 1960s…

One of James Forman's business cards from his time working with the Unemployment and Poverty Action Committee (UPAC) and the Black America News Service (BANS) in Washington, D.C.
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