Queens College Civil Rights Archives

Search

Search using this query type:



Search only these record types:

Item
File
Collection
Exhibit
Exhibit Page
Simple Page

Advanced Search (Items only)

Letter to the Editor on CUNY

Files

Title

Letter to the Editor on CUNY

Description

Included in this photocopy are letters from various individuals, including Forbes Hill, which defend against comments negative to CUNY practices in remedial education and board appointments.

Subject

City University of New York
Remedial teaching

Creator

Hill, Forbes I.
Levine, Israel E.
Glick, Deborah J.
Balleisen, Ellen

Source

ForbesHillCollection.Box1.Folder6

Publisher

Queens College Department of Special Collections and Archives (New York, N.Y.)

Date

1999-06-05

Rights

This material may be protected by the U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.). We welcome you to make fair use of the content accessible on this website as defined by copyright law. Please note that you are responsible for determining whether your use is fair and for responding to any claims that may arise from your use.

Format

Image
JPEG
443293 bytes

Language

English

Type

Text

Coverage

New York (N.Y.)

Text

[cut off]
*
To the Editor: A June 2 editorial cites "outrage" among "longtime supporters" of the City University of New York at the appointment of Herman Badillo as chairman of the university's board of trustees. I do not know who these "longtime supporters" are, but I am certain that they do not include many of us who were graduated from one of the CUNY colleges before 1970 or who served on the faculty or staff then. In my opinion, the Badillo appointment is the best thing that could have happened to CUNY.
I recall joining Mr. Badillo on speaking engagements in the early 1960's in an effort to preserve CUNY's free tuition policy, which for a century provided generations of New Yorkers with the only higher education opportunity available to them. I am certain that his purpose now, as then, will be to keep college gates open to the masses, consistent with high quality.
ISRAEL E. LEVINE
New York, June 2, 1999
The writer was an administrator at City College, 1946-77.
*
To the Editor:
A June 4 news article on commencements at Hunter and Queens College emphasized the conflict over remedial education at the City University of New York and the controversial appointment of Herman Badillo as chairman of the board of trustees. That's not what was important to me as I donned hood and gown to take part in the ceremony at Queens College. I looked to our jubilee graduates in their golden robes: doctors, businessmen and lawyers returned after 50 years to celebrate with their college.
The return of these distinguished graduates is an example of loyalty to an institution that has been near the center of political storms and yet has survived. Some of the students who are graduating now will be in the next generation of business and professional leaders.
FORBES HILL
Brooklyn, June 5, 1999
The writer is an associate professor of media studies, Queens College, CUNY.

[cut off]
ards: Raise the bar for graduation as high as you like. But it is wrong to starve the university of resources, thereby closing the door to opportunity.
DEBORAH J. GLICK
Member of Assembly, 66th Dist.
Albany, June 3, 1999
*
To the Editor:
Herman Badillo, the chairman of the City University of New York's board of trustees, has said he wants all remedial programs to follow the model of CUNY's language-immersion institutes (news article, June 2).
As a teacher in one of these institutes, I am pleased that Mr. Badillo feels our work merits duplication. Our program provides immigrant students with 25 hours a week of high-quality instruction. But I hope that he will look at the employment status of language-immersion teachers before he creates other institutes based on our model.
Even though my colleagues and I may teach more than twice as many hours a term as full-time faculty, we are considered part-time employees. Unlike full-time faculty, we have no contractual right to raises based on experience, and we receive only limited benefits. If our work is crucial to the success of CUNY's mission, the university must provide us with full-time status and full benefits.
ELLEN BALLEISEN
New York, June 5, 1999

Original Format

Paper
Newspaper photocopy
8.5 x 11 inches (216 x 279 mm)

Citation

Hill, Forbes I. et al., “Letter to the Editor on CUNY,” Queens College Civil Rights Archives, accessed May 17, 2022, http://archives.qc.cuny.edu/civilrights/items/show/326.

Geolocation