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Air Reserve Forces Review

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Title

Air Reserve Forces Review

Description

Air Reserve Forces Review is a newsletter addressed to the various reserve forces of the United States Air Force, including the Air Force Reserve, Air National Guard, ROTC, Civil Air Patrol, and Explorers. This issue from October, 1951 covers recent reserve actions, legislative activity, and new opportunities for education and training. (Selections - full volume available from Queens College Archives)

Subject

United States--Air Force ROTC
United States—Armed Forces—Recruiting, enlistment, etc.—Law and legislation

Creator

United States. Air Force

Source

AirForceROTCCollection.Box1.Folder6

Publisher

Queens College Department of Special Collections and Archives (New York, N.Y.)

Date

1951-10

Rights

This material may be protected by the U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.). We welcome you to make fair use of the content accessible on this website as defined by copyright law. Please note that you are responsible for determining whether your use is fair and for responding to any claims that may arise from your use.

Format

Image
JPEG
348073 bytes
312246 bytes
410650 bytes
441072 bytes

Language

English

Type

Text

Coverage

United States

Text

AIR RESERVE FORCES Review

October 1951

AIR FORCE RESERVE
AIR NATIONAL GUARD
AIR FORCE ROTC
CIVIL AIR PATROL
EXPLORERS, BSA

"ON TARGET"....
FOR A DYNAMIC RESERVE

Realistic policies & aims assure firm training programs keyed to AF needs - equitable treatment of reservists - effective use of manpower - widespread training opportunities

THE PROBLEM
The Air Force, by Secretary Marshall's directive of 6 April 1951, must provide appropriate plans and programs for the establishment of an effective and dynamic Air Force reserve force. These plans must make it possible for the reservist to exercise his rights and meet his obligations to actively participate in the training to be offered. They must take into consideration the special responsibilities held by the reservist as a "Minute Man" type of civilian, and must set forth clearly his relationship with the armed forces.
Faith must be kept with the reservist in providing equitable treatment within the exigencies of a national mobilization.

THE ATTACK
On 4 June 1951, a committee was formed, composed of members of the Air Staff representing all major phases of Air Force planning, plus two reservists selected to work with this group. Robert J. Smith (Brig Gen, USAFR) serving as a special consultant, was the committee chairman. The committee was charged with the development of a realistic long range plan for the AF Reserve Forces, related and responsive to the defined requirements of the USAF.

THE ANSWER
The Department of the Air Force Long Range Plan for the Reserve Forces of the USAF - based on recommendations submitted by the Smith Committee - was approved by Secretary Finletter on 9 August 1951. This plan imposes a dual obligation for both the active AF and the reservists to bring forth strength and efficiency in the skills required. The highlights of this plan are described in the succeeding pages of this REVIEW.

SOME HIGHLIGHTS OF PUBLIC LAW 51
UNIVERSAL MILITARY TRAINING & SERVICE ACT

1 The typical American in George Washington's day was a lot easier to turn into a good soldier than is his counterpart today.

2 Drawing numbers out of a goldfish bowl used to be the way of deciding who would serve first. It was done last in March 1942.

3 Inductees, Reservists, and National Guardsmen ordered into the Armed Forces before 19 June 1951 were called for 21 months, but the new law makes their term 24 months unless sooner released.*

*Present plans do not contemplate extension of service to 24 months in the case of AF Reserve or Air National Guard personnel on EAD at the time PL 51 was passed (19 June 1951).

4 The Armed Forces needed all the trained men they could find to demothball ships, take airplanes out of storage, and reactivate combat units.

5 Before the law was passed, no more than 2 percent of the members of any Service could be women. That limit is now suspended for 3 years.

6 You can write to your Congressmen if you keep your letters within the law and within security regulations.

7 If your former civilian boss has sold his business, the new owner must rehire you, if he can, when you leave the service.

If you were inducted before 19 June 1951...
At the time of your separation...
You may elect...
To serve one more year...
To put in three years with a reserve unit...
Or five years in the inactive reserve...

Drawings courtesy of "ARMED FORCES TALK"

Original Format

Paper
Newsletter
8.5 x 11 inches (216 x 279 mm)

Tags

Citation

United States. Air Force, “Air Reserve Forces Review,” Queens College Archives and Special Collections, accessed November 22, 2017, http://archives.qc.cuny.edu/queenscollege/items/show/459.